Symbian Authors: Jack Newton, Kevin Benedict, Matthew Lobas, Shelly Palmer, RealWire News Distribution

News Feed Item

LBS Platforms and Technologies - 4th Edition

NEW YORK, Nov. 29, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:


LBS Platforms and Technologies – 4th Edition



Executive summary


Location platforms comprise software and hardware extensions to network infrastructure components that together can calculate the position of a handset. Mobile location platforms enable three categories of location-based services (LBS): public safety services, national security and law enforcement applications, as well as commercial LBS. Nearly 70 percent of all emergency calls are today placed from mobile phones and it can often be difficult for the caller to convey their location accurately to first responders. Location platforms can reduce the time to find the location of the caller. They also enable more efficient handling of simultaneous calls from people reporting the same incident to distinguish single accidents from multiple events. Another use case is public warning systems that can locate and send messages to all mobile users within a geo-fenced area. Government agencies can also use location platforms and data mining systems for critical infrastructure protection and locationenhanced lawful intercept.


Location technologies can be divided into handset-based technologies (such as GPS) with intelligence mainly in the handset, network-based technologies (for instance Cell-ID, RF Pattern Matching and U-TDOA) with intelligence mainly in the network, as well as hybrid technologies (for instance A-GPS) with intelligence in both the handset and the network. Several new hybrid location technologies are in development, aiming to improve the performance of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in difficult environments. If not enough satellites are visible, it is for instance possible to fuse GNSS measurements with other network signals and data from inertial sensors to calculate the position. In pure indoor environments where GNSS is unavailable, the most common location technologies rely on Wi-Fi location using RF Pattern Matching or multilateration, augmented with data from sensors in the handset such as accelerometer, gyroscope, compass and barometer. The Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) E911 mandates for location of mobile emergency calls released in 1996 was a major driver behind the development of location platforms for the North American market. In Europe, as well as in other developed countries such as Japan and South Korea, early deployments of location platforms focused on supporting commercial services due to the lack of a clear mandate for emergency services. In the first deployment phase, lasting from 2000 to 2003, operators invested in platforms and ready-made services.


Overall, the results did not live up to the expectations in terms of uptake or usage and many operators therefore lost interest in LBS as a mass-market proposition. A majority of commercial LBS now use location data obtained directly from GPS receivers and Wi-Fi chipsets in the handset, or various third party location databases, rather than directly from operators using network-based location. Mobile operators are however showing increasing interest in using mass location data for advertising and marketing, as well as new services like analytics. Moreover, governments and telecom regulators worldwide are now introducing emergency call and lawful intercept mandates that require at least basic location platforms. Although the regulators have typically not yet imposed any specific location accuracy requirements as part of the mandates, more stringent location accuracy may well be demanded in the future as technologies mature and costs decrease. A diverse set of players are now developing indoor location platforms to support use-cases ranging from emergency call location to navigation, shopping, analytics and marketing. The established location platform vendors and connectivity chipset vendors are extending their offerings to enable indoor location. In addition, a growing number of technology specialists and start-up companies are also introducing software or infrastructure solutions that enable handset vendors, app developers and enterprises to add indoor location capabilities to smartphones that are already on the market.


Berg Insight estimates that one third of all mobile network operators worldwide have deployed at least some type of basic location platform. Additional deployments and updates of existing platforms can be expected in most markets in the coming years, primarily driven by government mandates, but also by new mass location applications such as advertising and analytics. Berg Insight forecasts that total global annual revenues for GMLC/MPC, SMLC/PDE, SUPL A-GNSS and probe-based location systems will grow from € 180 million in 2011 to € 330 million in 2017. These revenues comprise integration fees and licenses for new platform deployments, as well as capacity and technology upgrades, maintenance and associated services.



Table of Contents


Executive summary.1

1 Introduction to location platforms3

1.1 Location platforms and location-based services.3

1.1.1 Overview of mobile location platforms4

1.1.2 A brief history of location platforms and services .4

1.2 Mobile communication services6

1.2.1 Mobile voice and data subscribers .7

1.2.2 Mobile voice and SMS service revenues 8

1.2.3 Mobile data and application revenues 8

1.2.4 Location apps and service revenues 9

1.3 Mobile location platforms and technologies .10

1.3.1 Mobile location platforms10

1.3.2 Mobile location technologies 11

1.3.3 Location middleware.13

1.4 The mobile LBS value chain14

1.4.1 Location technology developers and platform vendors .14

1.4.2 Connectivity chipset vendors 15

1.4.3 LBS middleware vendors 16

1.4.4 Indoor location solution providers 16

1.4.5 Mobile network operators .17

1.4.6 Location aggregators and database providers.17

1.4.7 Smartphone platform and handset vendors .18

1.4.8 Mobile application developers and service providers 18

1.5 Telecoms regulations drive location platform deployments .19

1.5.1 European emergency call and privacy regulations 19

1.5.2 LBS regulatory environment in the US21

1.5.3 Emergency call regulations in Australia23

1.5.4 Emergency call regulations in Canada .23

1.5.5 The Indian Department of Telecommunications location mandate24

1.5.6 Emergency call regulations in Japan24

2 Technology overview.25

2.1 Mobile network location platforms 26

2.1.1 Location architecture for GSM/UMTS networks26

2.1.2 Location architecture for LTE networks 27

2.1.3 Location architecture and technologies in 3GPP2 networks28

2.1.4 Control Plane and User Plane location platforms .29

2.1.5 OMA SUPL 1.0 30

2.1.6 OMA SUPL 2.0 and SUPL 2.1 .30

2.1.7 OMA SUPL 3.0 32

2.1.8 Handset client and probe-based location platforms.33

2.1.9 Location in converged IP networks.34

2.2 Network-based positioning technologies35

2.2.1 Cell-ID35

2.2.2 Enhanced Cell-ID and RF Pattern Matching methods37

2.2.3 E-OTD and OTDOA.37

2.2.4 Uplink Time Difference of Arrival (U-TDOA) 38

2.2.5 Bluetooth and Wi-Fi positioning40

2.3 GNSS and hybrid location technologies .41

2.3.1 GNSS: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and Compass .41

2.3.2 Assisted GPS and A-GNSS.44

2.3.3 Hybrid, mixed mode and indoor location technologies46

2.4 Comparison of location technologies47

2.4.1 Network-based location technologies.48

2.4.2 Handset-based and hybrid location technologies49

2.4.3 Location technologies in development .50

3 Location technology market trends.51

3.1 Multiple parallel efforts drive location technology development.51

3.1.1 Emergency call location and public safety .51

3.1.2 Location-enhanced lawful intercept and national security52

3.1.3 Consumer and enterprise LBS and apps53

3.1.4 Commercial indoor location services55

3.1.5 Mobile marketing and advertising.56

3.1.6 Fraud management and secure authentication56

3.2 Smartphone ecosystems.57

3.2.1 Smartphone platform market shares 59

3.2.2 Smartphone platforms transform into new vertical silos.60

3.2.3 Towards a complete LBS stack 60

4 Commercial deployments61

4.1 Platform deployments in Europe.62

4.1.1 3 Group .65

4.1.2 Deutsche Telekom Group .65

4.1.3 KPN Group 66

4.1.4 Orange Group .66

4.1.5 SFR67

4.1.6 Telecom Italia Mobile 68

4.1.7 Telefónica Group.68

4.1.8 Telenor Group .69

4.1.9 TeliaSonera Group 70

4.1.10 Vodafone Group71

4.2 Platform deployments in the Americas72

4.2.1 AT&T Mobility 74

4.2.2 Bell Mobility .74

4.2.3 Rogers Wireless 75

4.2.4 Sprint Nextel 75

4.2.5 TELUS .75

4.2.6 Verizon Wireless76

4.2.7 Wind Mobile.76

4.3 Platform deployments in Asia-Pacific 76

4.3.1 BSNL .78

4.3.2 China Mobile .78

4.3.3 NTT DoCoMo 78

4.3.4 Telstra79

4.3.5 Telkomsel 79

4.4 Platform deployments in ROW80

5 Market forecasts and trends 81

5.1 LBS market trends .81

5.1.1 Emergency call mandates remain the key driver for platform deployments 82

5.1.2 Location-enabled lawful intercept .82

5.1.3 Location-based services revenue forecast .83

5.2 Handset market trends 84

5.2.1 GNSS attach rates driven by higher smartphone sales85

5.2.2 GNSS-enabled handset shipment forecasts by segment.86

5.3 Location platform deployments.87

5.3.1 Vendor market shares .87

5.3.2 GMLC/MPC and SMLC/PDE platform deployment forecasts.88

5.3.3 SUPL A-GPS server deployment forecast.90

5.3.4 Location middleware deployment forecast.92

6 Location platform and technology vendor profiles93

6.1 Location platform and infrastructure vendors .93

6.1.1 Alcatel-Lucent95

6.1.2 CommScope .96

6.1.3 Creativity Software.97

6.1.4 Ericsson.98

6.1.5 GBSD Technologies99

6.1.6 Intersec100

6.1.7 Mobile Arts 101

6.1.8 Nokia Siemens Networks 103

6.1.9 Oksijen.103

6.1.10 Persistent Systems104

6.1.11 Polaris Wireless .105

6.1.12 Redknee 106

6.1.13 Septier .106

6.1.14 TeleCommunication Systems .107

6.1.15 TruePosition 109

6.2 Location middleware vendors .111

6.2.1 Aepona 111

6.2.2 CellVision.112

6.2.3 Genasys 113

6.2.4 Mobilaris 114

6.2.5 Reach-U.115

6.2.6 Telenity 116

6.3 GNSS chipset and assistance server vendors 118

6.3.1 Broadcom120

6.3.2 CSR .121

6.3.3 Qualcomm.122

6.3.4 Rx Networks 123

6.4 Client-based location platforms, aggregators and databases125

6.4.1 Apigee .125

6.4.2 Combain Mobile 126

6.4.3 Geoloqi127

6.4.4 Locaid127

6.4.5 Location Labs128

6.4.6 Navizon130

6.4.7 Skyhook Wireless131

6.5 Indoor location technology developers.132

6.5.1 Boeing .132

6.5.2 ByteLight .134

6.5.3 Cisco Systems.134

6.5.4 GloPos.135

6.5.5 IndoorAtlas 136

6.5.6 Insiteo 137

6.5.7 Nearbuy Systems138

6.5.8 NextNav.138

6.5.9 Nokia .139

6.5.10 Point Inside140

6.5.11 Pole Star 140

6.5.12 Qubulus.141

6.5.13 SenionLab .141

6.5.14 Walkbase.142

6.5.15 Wifarer .143

6.5.16 WiFiSLAM 144

Glossary 145


List of Figures


Figure 1.1: Wireless cellular subscribers by standard (World Q2-2012)6

Figure 1.2: Mobile subscriptions by region (World Q2-2012) 7

Figure 1.3: Wireless service revenues (World 2011) 9

Figure 1.4: Mobile location system overview10

Figure 1.5: Overview of the LBS value chain 15

Figure 2.1: Location architecture overview.27

Figure 2.2: Location Information Server in converged IP networks .34

Figure 2.3: Cellular frequency reuse pattern 35

Figure 2.4: Cell-ID location methods 36

Figure 2.5: U-TDOA location.39

Figure 2.6: Assisted GPS technologies 45

Figure 2.7: Performance and limiting factors for network-based location technologies47

Figure 2.8: Performance and limiting factors for hybrid location technologies49

Figure 3.1: Smartphone adoption by region (World 2010–2012).57

Figure 3.2: Smartphone shipments by vendor and OS (World H1-2012) 58

Figure 4.1: Location infrastructure and technology vendor customer references .61

Figure 4.2: Location infrastructure deployments in Europe .62

Figure 4.3: Location infrastructure deployments in the Americas72

Figure 4.4: Location infrastructure deployments in Asia-Pacific 77

Figure 4.5: Location infrastructure deployments in ROW.80

Figure 5.1: Emergency and commercial LBS revenue forecast (World 2011–2017) .83

Figure 5.2: Handset shipment forecast by segment (World 2010–2016).84

Figure 5.3: GNSS-enabled handset shipment forecast by segment (World 2010–2016) 86

Figure 5.4: Location infrastructure vendor market shares (World 2012)87

Figure 5.5: Location platform revenues (World 2011–2017) 88

Figure 6.1: Location infrastructure and technology vendors93

Figure 6.2: Location infrastructure and technology product offerings by vendor94

Figure 6.3: Major location middleware vendors .111

Figure 6.4: Examples of GNSS chipset and assistance server developers .118

Figure 6.5: Location aggregators and client-based location platform developers.125

Figure 6.6: Overview of indoor location technologies by vendor.133




To order this report:

IT_Services Industry: LBS Platforms and Technologies – 4th Edition


Nicolas Bombourg
Email: [email protected]
US: (805)652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626


SOURCE Reportlinker

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

@ThingsExpo Stories
Established in 1998, Calsoft is a leading software product engineering Services Company specializing in Storage, Networking, Virtualization and Cloud business verticals. Calsoft provides End-to-End Product Development, Quality Assurance Sustenance, Solution Engineering and Professional Services expertise to assist customers in achieving their product development and business goals. The company's deep domain knowledge of Storage, Virtualization, Networking and Cloud verticals helps in delivering ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Hitrons Solutions will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Hitrons Solutions Inc. is distributor in the North American market for unique products and services of small and medium-size businesses, including cloud services and solutions, SEO marketing platforms, and mobile applications.
The Internet of Things (IoT), in all its myriad manifestations, has great potential. Much of that potential comes from the evolving data management and analytic (DMA) technologies and processes that allow us to gain insight from all of the IoT data that can be generated and gathered. This potential may never be met as those data sets are tied to specific industry verticals and single markets, with no clear way to use IoT data and sensor analytics to fulfill the hype being given the IoT today.
OnProcess Technology has announced it will be a featured speaker at @ThingsExpo, taking place November 1 - 3, 2016, in Santa Clara, California. Dan Gettens, OnProcess’ Chief Analytics Officer, will discuss how Internet of Things (IoT) data can be leveraged to predict product failures, improve uptime and slash costly inventory stock. @ThingsExpo is an annual gathering of IoT and cloud developers, practitioners and thought-leaders who exchange ideas and insights on topics ranging from Big Data in...
Intelligent machines are here. Robots, self-driving cars, drones, bots and many IoT devices are becoming smarter with Machine Learning. In her session at @ThingsExpo, Sudha Jamthe, CEO of IoTDisruptions.com, will discuss the next wave of business disruption at the junction of IoT and AI, impacting many industries and set to change our lives, work and world as we know it.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Enzu will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Enzu’s mission is to be the leading provider of enterprise cloud solutions worldwide. Enzu enables online businesses to use its IT infrastructure to their competitive advantage. By offering a suite of proven hosting and management services, Enzu wants companies to focus on the core of their online busine...
The explosion of new web/cloud/IoT-based applications and the data they generate are transforming our world right before our eyes. In this rush to adopt these new technologies, organizations are often ignoring fundamental questions concerning who owns the data and failing to ask for permission to conduct invasive surveillance of their customers. Organizations that are not transparent about how their systems gather data telemetry without offering shared data ownership risk product rejection, regu...
The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), sponsor of the IoTivity open source project, and AllSeen Alliance, which provides the AllJoyn® open source IoT framework, today announced that the two organizations’ boards have approved a merger under the OCF name and bylaws. This merger will advance interoperability between connected devices from both groups, enabling the full operating potential of IoT and representing a significant step towards a connected ecosystem.
November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Penta Security is a leading vendor for data security solutions, including its encryption solution, D’Amo. By using FPE technology, D’Amo allows for the implementation of encryption technology to sensitive data fields without modification to schema in the database environment. With businesses having their data become increasingly more complicated in their mission-critical applications (such as ERP, CRM, HRM), continued ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Embotics, the cloud automation company, will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Embotics is the cloud automation company for IT organizations and service providers that need to improve provisioning or enable self-service capabilities. With a relentless focus on delivering a premier user experience and unmatched customer support, Embotics is the fas...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Cloudbric, a leading website security provider, will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Cloudbric is an elite full service website protection solution specifically designed for IT novices, entrepreneurs, and small and medium businesses. First launched in 2015, Cloudbric is based on the enterprise level Web Application Firewall by Penta Security Sys...
Smart Cities are here to stay, but for their promise to be delivered, the data they produce must not be put in new siloes. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mathias Herberts, Co-founder and CTO of Cityzen Data, will deep dive into best practices that will ensure a successful smart city journey.
Data is the fuel that drives the machine learning algorithmic engines and ultimately provides the business value. In his session at Cloud Expo, Ed Featherston, a director and senior enterprise architect at Collaborative Consulting, will discuss the key considerations around quality, volume, timeliness, and pedigree that must be dealt with in order to properly fuel that engine.
SYS-CON Events announced today that MathFreeOn will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MathFreeOn is Software as a Service (SaaS) used in Engineering and Math education. Write scripts and solve math problems online. MathFreeOn provides online courses for beginners or amateurs who have difficulties in writing scripts. In accordance with various mathematical topics, there are more tha...
Successful digital transformation requires new organizational competencies and capabilities. Research tells us that the biggest impediment to successful transformation is human; consequently, the biggest enabler is a properly skilled and empowered workforce. In the digital age, new individual and collective competencies are required. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Bob Newhouse, CEO and founder of Agilitiv, will draw together recent research and lessons learned from emerging and established ...
The best way to leverage your Cloud Expo presence as a sponsor and exhibitor is to plan your news announcements around our events. The press covering Cloud Expo and @ThingsExpo will have access to these releases and will amplify your news announcements. More than two dozen Cloud companies either set deals at our shows or have announced their mergers and acquisitions at Cloud Expo. Product announcements during our show provide your company with the most reach through our targeted audiences.
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, will discuss how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team a...
Virgil consists of an open-source encryption library, which implements Cryptographic Message Syntax (CMS) and Elliptic Curve Integrated Encryption Scheme (ECIES) (including RSA schema), a Key Management API, and a cloud-based Key Management Service (Virgil Keys). The Virgil Keys Service consists of a public key service and a private key escrow service. 

@ThingsExpo has been named the Top 5 Most Influential Internet of Things Brand by Onalytica in the ‘The Internet of Things Landscape 2015: Top 100 Individuals and Brands.' Onalytica analyzed Twitter conversations around the #IoT debate to uncover the most influential brands and individuals driving the conversation. Onalytica captured data from 56,224 users. The PageRank based methodology they use to extract influencers on a particular topic (tweets mentioning #InternetofThings or #IoT in this ...
More and more brands have jumped on the IoT bandwagon. We have an excess of wearables – activity trackers, smartwatches, smart glasses and sneakers, and more that track seemingly endless datapoints. However, most consumers have no idea what “IoT” means. Creating more wearables that track data shouldn't be the aim of brands; delivering meaningful, tangible relevance to their users should be. We're in a period in which the IoT pendulum is still swinging. Initially, it swung toward "smart for smar...